A Different Cinematic Experience

I love going to the movies, films truly are made to be seen on a huge screen, in a very dark room, with surround sound and lots of other people in that room to share the experience with. Recently I went to the annual Travelling Film Festival with my mum that literally travels all over Australia to show case international films at local cinemas to give people the opportunity to see award winning films they would normally never get to see screened in a cinema. It runs over one weekend in a movie marathon type set up with films all playing within half an hour of each other. I’ll admit I probably wouldn’t have gone if it wasn’t for my amazing mother who loves international films and all things culturally enlightening. The initial reason why she bought me a ticket was because there was a Spanish murder mystery playing, and I am currently in my second year of studying Spanish at University and therefore thought it would further my studies.

I met my mum at the cinema and she was of course, true to her nature, already immersed in conversation with somebody she knew.  It is a given that the audience for a movie at the cinema is always different depending on what the movie is, the movie was called “Marshland” set in the wet lands of southern Spain, the audience for this film was of an older generation, some of the people were what I would describe as ‘alternative’ but some were also very average looking. However I knew it was a very different audience to the people you see at the regular hollywood block busters. In fact as soon as we arrived at the cinema I spotted my old Spanish tutor. My mother and I sat much closer to the front than I would normally, mostly because her eye sight isn’t the best (sorry mum). It was clear that many of the others in the front rows had chosen their position for similar reasons.

This was a very different cinematic experience from the usual blockbuster experience, there was a short introductory speech for the film by the MC for the film festival which created a sense of togetherness and excitement within the space. As the cinema is generally considered a public space, there are certain rules of conduct. For instance one man was snoring during the film which is pretty frowned upon in any cinema and also just strange in the first place because we all paid a certain amount of money which allowed us to be there so I would conclude that he was wasting his money by sleeping whilst also disallowing others to fully enjoy the film.

At the end of the film everyone clapped, which rarely happens normally, but there was a sense that we were expected to clap because it could be assumed we were all there with a similar interest in either international films, Spain as a country, the Spanish language, murder mysteries and also just for the fact that it was a very good movie. It was so good in fact that I decided to stay and buy a ticket for the following film which my mum had already bought a ticket to. The next film was not Spanish nor all that international, it was an American art house comedy called ‘Grandma’, but I think the reason I stayed was for the fact that I enjoyed the atmosphere of this different type of cinematic experience I had never before been around. I hope that in 5-10 years exposure to international films is more widely available to smaller communities and society can start to steer away from the obsession with same old Hollywood films.

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